My Own Notes


Please Login to save notes.

If you are not a registered user, then click here.

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass
Frederick Douglass

Previous Page 28 of 128 Next Page
     
CHAPTER III
 
Colonel Lloyd kept a large and finely cultivated garden, which afforded almost constant employment for four men, besides the chief gardener, (Mr. M'Durmond.) This garden was probably the greatest attraction of the place. During the summer months, people came from far and near — from Baltimore, Easton, and Annapolis — to see it. It abounded in fruits of almost every description, from the hardy apple of the north to the delicate orange of the south. This garden was not the least source of trouble on the plantation. Its excellent fruit was quite a temptation to the hungry swarms of boys, as well as the older slaves, belonging to the colonel, few of whom had the virtue or the vice to resist it. Scarcely a day passed, during the summer, but that some slave had to take the lash for stealing fruit. The colonel had to resort to all kinds of stratagems to keep his slaves out of the garden. The last and most successful one was that of tarring his fence all around; after which, if a slave was caught with any tar upon his person, it was deemed sufficient proof that he had either been into the garden, or had tried to get in. In either case, he was severely whipped by the chief gardener. This plan worked well; the slaves became as fearful of tar as of the lash. They seemed to realize the impossibility of touching tarwithout being defiled. 
Previous Page Table of Contents Next Page
     
Videos
Go to page:   
Top

Copyright © 2017 Gleeditions, LLC. All rights reserved.